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10:30 | 11:15 | 12:00 | 13:30 | 14:15 | 15:00

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Registered Office: 341 Lytham Road, Blackpool, FY4 1DS

Company number: 07804276

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DISCOVER CHESTER

ROMAN AMPHITHEATRE

The Roman Amphitheatre in Chester was the largest in Britain. Used for Entertainment and military training, there have been two stone-built amphitheatres on the site.

OVERLEIGH CEMETERY

Overleigh Cemetery is a Victorian cemetery located across the River Dee and Grosvenor Bridge. Due to the graveyards in the city being full it was decided to build a new cemetery outside the city walls. The cemetery contains the grave of the famous Victorian architect John Douglas and Edward Langtree.

CANAL BASIN

The Chester Canal was originally planned as a rival to the Trent & Mersey Canal which was then still under construction. It was proposed because the traders of Chester feared that the Trent & Mersey Canal would steal trade away from the River Dee.

CHESTER TOWN HALL

The town hall is much regarded as the symbolic expression of civic government, having changed very little in external appearance since its completion in 1869.

The building still retains its Victorian magnificence and is a prestigious venue available for public hire.

THE GROVES

The Groves is a riverside area in the heart of Chester, running alongside the River Dee which starts at the Old Dee Bridge and includes the Suspension Bridge to the Queen's Park area. The paved promenade comes complete with benches, cafes, restaurants, public houses and a bandstand that hosts bands and performers during the Summer. River Cruises are available along with rowing boats and pedalo's.

OLD DEE BRIDGE

At the end of Bridge Street is the Old Dee Bridge. The oldest bridge in Chester. The first Dee Bridge was built in 922 and was made of wood. Legend says that when King Edward I crossed over on his way to fight the welsh, he decreed that if a stone bridge was not constructed he would sack the city. 

GROSVENOR MUSEUM

The Grosvenor Museum houses collections exploring the history of Chester, its art and silver heritage, and its natural history. Find out about life during the Roman military occupation and visit the Period House, with rooms from the 17th century to the 1920s. The museum is named after Hugh Lupus Grosvenor, 1st Duke of Westminster.

KING CHARLES TOWER

King Charles' Tower stands on the North-East corner of the city walls overlooking the canal. It got its name as legend has it on the 24th September 1645 King Charles stood on the tower and watched his army defeated in the battle of Rowton Moor.

EASTGATE CLOCK

Eastgate and Eastgate Clock stand on the site of the original entrance to the Roman fortress of Deva Victrix. It is a prominent landmark in the city of Chester and is said to be the most photographed clock in England after Big Ben.

CHESTER CASTLE

William the Conqueror ordered the original Norman castle to be built here in 1069-1070 when Chester became the last Saxon burgh to fall during his subjugation of northern England. After the Saxons surrendered their city a large motte-and-bailey castle was built on the site of a Roman auxiliary fort of 79 AD, overlooking the lowest fording point of the river. The Roman fortress-city of Deva had been refortified around 907AD by the Mercian king Aethelfleda to withstand the Danes after their expulsion from Ireland but it's unclear if the Normans reused the Saxon fort. What is known is that William destroyed half the Saxon houses in Chester to accommodate his new works.

ROODEE RACECOURSE

Chester Racecourse, known as Roodee, is according to official records the oldest racecourse still in use in England. Horse racing at Chester dates back to the early sixteenth century.

CHESTER CATHEDRAL

The original church was built in the Romanesque or Norman style, parts of which can still be seen today. This church was subsequently rebuilt from around 1250 onward in the Gothic style, a process which took about 275 years and resulted in the incredible structure seen today.

CHESTER ROWS

The Rows were built in the four main streets leading from Chester Cross, dating from the medieval era, the Rows may have been built on top of rubble remaining from the ruins of Roman buildings, but their origin is still subject to speculation. Undercrofts or 'crypts' were constructed beneath the buildings in the Rows, today about 20 of the stone undercrofts still exist, but at the level of the Rows very little medieval fabric remains. Chester Rows are one of the city's main tourist attractions.